SS Princess Alice (1911)

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SS Princess Alice 1912.jpg
SS Princess Alice c. 1912
Career
Name: 1911-1949: SS Princess Alice
1949-1966 SS Aegaeon
Owner: 1911-1949: Canadian Pacific
1949-1966: Typaldos Line
Port of registry: 1911-1949: Canada
1949-1966: Greece
Builder: Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson
Yard number: 833
Launched: March 29, 1911
Completed: September 1911
Out of service: 1966
Fate: wrecked in tow at Civitavecchia, December 1966
General characteristics
Class & type: Ocean liner
Tonnage: 3,099 tons
Length: 290.6 ft (88.6 m)

SS Princess Alice was a passenger vessel in the coastal service fleet of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) during the first half of the 20th century.

This ship was called a "pocket liner" because she offered amenities like a great ocean liner, but on a smaller scale. The ship was part of the CPR "Princess fleet," which was composed of ships having names which began with the title "Princess". Along with the SS Princess Adelaide the SS Princess Mary and the SS Princess Sophia, the SS Princess Alice was one of four sister ships built for CPR during 1910-1911.

History[edit]

The SS Princess Alice was built by Swan Hunter, Wallsend, United Kingdom for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Princess Alice was launched on May 29, 1911; and she was completed in September 1911.

The 3,099-ton vessel had length of 290.6 feet (88.6 m), breadth of 46.1 feet (14.1 m), and depth of 14.3 feet (4.4 m)

In 1913, Princess Alice made several special Alaskan cruises through the inside passage at reduced rate of $60 round trip.

In 1949, the ship was sold to Typaldos Lines, and she was renamed SS Aegaeon.

The ship was wrecked wrecked in tow at Civitavecchia in December 1966.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Steamship Historical Society of America. (1940). Steamboat Bill (US), Vol. 54, p. 206.
  2. ^ Turner, Robert D. (1987). West of the Great Divide: an Illustrated History of the Canadian Pacific Railway in British Columbia, 1880-1986, p. 65.
  3. ^ Cruising the Pacific Northwest, 1910-1911 sister ships
  4. ^ a b Plimsoll ship data, Lloyd's Register, Steamers and Motorships, 1945-46
  5. ^ a b Miramar Ship Index: SS Princess Alice, ID #5500364.
  6. ^ International Railway Journal, Vol. 21-22 (1913), p. 45., p. 45, at Google Books
  7. ^ Simplon Postcards, SS Princess Alice

References[edit]

Steamboats of British Columbia


Routes


Inland



Coastal and inland vessels


Propellers
Wood


Iron and steel




Sternwheelers